Business

NZ’s remoteness a feature for RedShield

RedShield Security is one of New Zealand’s quiet tech export success stories and is using this country’s relative remoteness and strong reputation to attack a big overseas market and remain based here.


Watch the video in the player above


Andy Prow is RedShield’s CEO and CoFounder, and is a finalist for this year’s EY Entrepreneur Of The Year award. He told Newsroom in the interview above that RedShield’s ability to offer huge Fortune 500 companies security software in the cloud allows it to stay at the bottom of the world and thrive. That includes using New Zealand’s strong reputation for being a reliable, honest and non-aligned player in a world where state-sponsored cyber-hacking is a reality.

RedShield won the Duncan Cotterill Innovative Software Product Award and the Kiwibank Innovative Services Award in this year’s Hi-Tech awards. It employs dozens of the world’s best anti-hackers and is able to quickly respond to attacks to protect its Northern Hemisphere clients in the middle of their night.

Prow is confident RedShield can keep growing from its Wellington HQ, thanks to recently building a Denver base and being able to use the scale and the scalability of its cloud-based systems without having to employ hundreds of software engineers to service and repair thousands of servers in locations around the world. Instead, RedShield is able to protect access to its clients’ systems in the cloud, avoiding having to protect and repair the software and systems at the myriad sites of its global clients.

Unlike many of New Zealand’s software-as-a-service (SAAS) export success stories, Prow says RedShield is in the unusual position of having a waiting list of engineers looking to join the company, given its reputation for being a global player in cyber-security and its ability to successfully win a running battle with the world’s toughest hackers.

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