Media monitoring

What’s in the newspapers - Nov 5

 Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters claims the New Zealand First Foundation was modelled on the National Party Foundation but records revealed in a Stuff investigation suggest otherwise; and  Fonterra's head of India says it only needs to capture 4-5 per cent of that country's dairy market to become a $1 billion revenue business, something it could do within seven-to-ten years.

* The New Zealand Herald

In the New Zealand Herald, a social club trip for workmates turned to tragedy at a remote East Coast beach when a man drowned after diving into rough seas. Three of the man’s colleagues desperately tried to save him during a heroic rescue attempt near Lottin Pt on the East Cape yesterday. They were joined by firefighters, St John and a rescue helicopter crew.

In other news, the Mongrel Mob's public relations spokeswoman was among those calling for the Government to scrap a controversial programme which critics say has seen the further arming of the police.That petition received 10,000 signatures and was presented to Greens co-leader Marama Davidson – who met with Police Commissioner Mike Bush to challenge him over the policy.

In business news, Fonterra's head of India says it only needs to capture 4-5 per cent of that country's dairy market to become a $1 billion revenue business, something it could do within seven-to-ten years.Sunil Sethi and three other executives from Fonterra's Indian joint venture today gave New Zealand media an update on the business, which is the cooperative's second attempt in the world's second-most populous nation.


* The Dominion Post

In the Dominion Post, midwives have launched a new campaign pushing for fair pay and working conditions.Midwives have been left with "no choice" but to go to the public for help and support, College of Midwives chief executive Alison Eddy said. "We need the public to back midwives so that politicians can hear our voices." 

In other news, Deputy Prime Minister Winston Peters claims the New Zealand First Foundation was modelled on the National Party Foundation but records revealed in a Stuff investigation suggest otherwise. During the urgent sitting of Parliament held to pass a law banning foreign donations of more than $50 to political parties, Peters faced accusations about the NZ First Foundation.

In business news, research house Fitch has downgraded its rating outlook for New Zealand banks to negative.It publishes ratings that reflect a business's ability to meet its financial commitments. The big four New Zealand banks are all rated AA-.An outlook indicates the direction in which Fitch expects ratings to move in future. 

 * The Press

In The Press, West Coast iwi are backing a call by Westland mayor Bruce Smith to disband the West Coast Conservation Board – because it is stacked with conservationists.Te Rūnanga o Ngāti Waewae and Te Rūnanga o Makaawhio – together as Poutini Ngāi Tahu – are calling on Conservation Minister Eugenie Sage to review the current board line-up.
  
In other news,  the Conservation Department of Conservation (DOC) is reviewing the way it decides when to destroy nature to protect the public.DOC came under fire from conservation groups in July after it blew up a sandstone overhang on the popular Truman Track in the Paparoa National Park, following a rockfall near a viewing platform.

In business news, a Christchurch surf lifesaving club struggling to run out of a quake-damaged building has new premises on the horizon. The New Brighton Surf Life Saving Club – one of the country's oldest – has been granted resource consent for a new clubrooms, to replace the existing building on Marine Parade.The project is expected to cost about $2.3 million. The build is expected to take about a year, but cannot start until a lease for the land has been finalised.   

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